Up to half of world’s food goes to waste, report says

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Posted by admin | Posted in Food Security | Posted on 25-01-2013

In India, for instance, as much as 40 per cent of all the fruits, vegetables and food grains never make it to the market. The country wastes more grain each year than Australia produces, and more fruits and vegetables than the U.K. consumes. Read more >>>>

As much as 2 billion metric tons of food are wasted each year, tantamount to nearly half the food produced worldwide, according to a report by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Waste in developed economies is attributed to marketing practices and consumer behavior. “This is food that could be used to feed the world’s growing population — as well as those in hunger today. It is also an unnecessary waste of the land, water and energy resources that were used in the production, processing and distribution of this food,” said Tim Fox of IME. Report from BBC Uk about food wastage

The hunger wars in our future

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Posted by admin | Posted in Food Security | Posted on 17-08-2012

The Great Drought of 2012 is yet to come to an end, but we already know that its consequences will be severe. With more than one-half of US counties designated as drought disaster areas, the 2012 harvest of corn, soybeans and other food staples is guaranteed to fall far short of predictions. This, in turn, will boost food prices domestically and abroad, causing increased misery for farmers and low-income Americans – and far greater hardship for poor people in countries that rely on imported US grains. Read more…

The state of food insecurity in the World

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Posted by admin | Posted in Agri Sci, Food Security | Posted on 31-12-2010

FAO Presentation The State of Food Insecurity in the World >>>>>

IFPRI 2020 Panel Discussion:Nourishing Plants & People

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Posted by admin | Posted in Agri Sci, Food Security | Posted on 31-12-2010

The role of emerging countries in global food security

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Posted by admin | Posted in Agri Sci, Food Security | Posted on 31-12-2010

Global food insecurity remains a serious problem. In 2010, more than 900 million people are still hungry, and progress toward reaching the first Millennium Development Goal of halving the world’s proportion of malnourished people is off track by a wide margin. But the global environment within which food insecurity persists is changing in important ways. Emerging countries such as Brazil, China, and India, which have experienced rapid growth and increased integration with the global economy in recent years, have significant potential to contribute to global food security—not only by alleviating hunger among their own citizens, but also by increasing trade and financial linkages as well as technology and knowledge exchanges with developing countries. Read the rest of this entry »